All Posts in Research

February 7, 2014Published by: Drew

New ComScore social media user trends report

Courtesy_of_ComScore1

The global media company ComScore has published a new report looking at media consumption habits and it is is well worth a read. It breaks down social media and youth / millennials differences to other age brackets and media types. Fresh data like this doesn't come about too often, so although it's US-specific it's good to see as a barometer.

Courtesy_of_ComScore2

All the trends you would expect are in there: Facebook's smaller audience with the youth demographic, Snapchat and Instagram's larger audience with that same group, and the growth of mobile. You can download the report in full here.

January 16, 2014Published by: Tom Bradley

Step 1 of Sentience: Give Robots Their Own Internet

..yes. It's true. According to the BBC and Independent, scientists at Eindhoven University in Holland are today launching RoboEarth, a prototype cloud engine for robots. Through this 'internet' of sorts, they can learn and share their independent knowledge with others.

On the site, RoboEarth announced: “These robots will use RoboEarth as a knowledge base, communication medium, and computational resource to offload some of their heavy computation.”

To begin with, four robots are going to be linked across the system, and put into a mock hospital room in the Dutch university, analysed on how they care for their 'patient'. If successful, it could be a big step towards robotic carers for the elderly and disabled.

Let's just hope that those helping the hindered don't get too smart and start acting like this rather evil fellow below...

HAL


October 4, 2013Published by: Tom Bradley

What does the media think of Twitter? [GRAPHIC]

What does the media really think of Twitter? Twitter's in all the headlines today, so we just thought we would do some work on something that caught our eye in the wake of the company filing for a $1bn IPO.

Quartz has posted a piece on the "complete history of Twitter as told through tortured descriptions of it in the New York Times". In this piece, Quartz researched and listed - extensively - every time the social network had been effectively "@'ed" by the newspaper throughout its seven-year history.

Most of us online know how word clouds work - those words that are bigger are ones that have been used the most often, and vice versa. So we put together all the statements in the Quartz post, and made the below graphic.

Twitter NYT Descriptions

Good old Larry bird.

As you can see, the five biggest words are - in usage order - "service", "users", "social", "short" and "site". So, it's a short social service site for its users.

And we think that pretty much covers it. Thank you Quartz for doing some great investigative work to find all the mentions of our favourite social network in the first place.

September 17, 2013Published by: Fereshta Amir

Social recruiting: what employers look for in online profiles

Screen Shot 2013-09-16 at 23.10.23

 

Social recruiting has seen universal adoption across industries and according to Jobvite's 6th Annual Social Recruiting Survey, anyone not leveraging social referrals is behind the curve. Top recruiters use social networks at each stage of the recruiting funnel, with 94% of recruiters using or planning to use social media in their recruitment efforts and 78% of recruiters already having made a hire through social media.

We all know LinkedIn is the largest social network for professionals and this research confirms that it remains the king of searching (96%), contacting (94%), vetting (92%) and keeping tab
of candidates (93%). Yet Facebook and Twitter should not be overlooked, as both are influential and not too far behind LinkedIn with 65% of recruiters using Facebook and 55% using Twitter for social recruiting.

Beside the big three, recruiters use a multitude of specialised, localised and
up-and-coming social networks. Including photo-sharing networks Instagram and Pinterest, enterprise social network Yammer, professional question and answer site Stackoverflow, video sharing network Vimeo and Chinese social network giant Weibo.

The results show that with a variety of channels to use, recruiters have the ability to customise their messages to the platform they're using. This means most recruiters have particular uses for each network: LinkedIn is used to look at professional experience, length of professional tenure and specific hard skills, whereas Facebook, Twitter and Google+ are mainly used to look at industry-related posts and to determine whether the candidate is a cultural fit.

Jobseekers, pay attention!


July 30, 2013Published by: Anton Perreau

Social media masters: A method in the madness?

Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 16.35.32

This week The Wall Street Journal announced a shift in job titles relating to social media. Between 2012 and 2013 the number of jobs with the term 'social media' was down by 9% according to indeed.com - additionally, jobs with the word 'Twitter' in the title dropped by 22%. But what does this mean about the world of work?

The main answer lies in finding a social media expertise, it's difficult for someone to understand social media strategy, if they don't have a role to play in the technical functions of an overall business strategy. In an attempt to tackle this new media, many universities are offering courses that focuses solely on this medium itself. The WSJ article by Zara Stone looks at The University of Florida, where an 18-month masters in Social Media is advertised to,

'...examine the impact of social media and explains how it can be used to influence the future of communication, marketing, journalism, politics, entertainment, public relations, and more.'

Understandably, educational establishments aim to broaden students' horizons, inspire them to do greater things or to dig deeper into the methodology (not practice) of their chosen subject. It could be difficult to dig into methodology of Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter though - as the intricate algorithms behind these platforms change daily.

The WSJ piece by Stone goes on to share that skill searches by potential employers with terms like 'Instagram' and 'Twitter' were up by 644% and 44% respectively, between 2012 and 2013. It seems that whilst candidates roles are becoming more integrated with bigger business goals, their innovative skill set is what matters.Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 17.09.00

Indeed social media has created an economy which is much more practical, volatile and intricate. You can't call social networking an industry - it cross-tangents with so many different departmental functions of any organisation that social media is a necessity everywhere. Needless to say, this all leads to one big question - when a candidate applies for a job, how will a degree or masters in social media be perceived, surely knowledge of new media, innovation, interpersonal skills and technology is more important?

Perhaps then the best way to really understand social media is to get hands on, learn how it applies to your pre-existing expertise and innovate the way you choose to use it.

July 17, 2013Published by: Fereshta Amir

Next step: wearable technology for pets

FIDO project

We're only just starting to see early adopters of wearable technology wandering the streets with their Pebble smart watch or Jawbone Up on the wrist and Google Glass on the head. We know that wearable technology is amazing and in the future we'll see it being used for animals, plants and even vehicles. Who's to say that one day you couldn't put a piece of wearable tech on your pet fish to find whether the pH level of the water is right.

We're now seeing wearable technology filter down to animals, as humans and their companions alike can benefit from wearable devices. Scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology have created a wearable canine computer that could allow dogs to send messages to handlers. This project, Facilitating Interactions for Dogs with Occupations (FIDO), is the brainchild of Thad Starner, the original technical lead of Google Glass.

FIDO works like this: the dog activates a sensor on its vest or collar to transmit a verbal command that the handler hears through an earpiece and view on a head-mounted display similar to Google Glass. Not only could this help disabled people navigate more effectively, FIDO could enable bomb-sniffing dogs to communicate with their handlers remotely and rescue dogs could alert a human team when they've found an injured person. The possibilities are endless! There will be a trial of FIDO of which results will presented at the International Semantic Web Conference in October.

Wearable technology products for animals have been around for a while. Luda offers monitoring products for horses and cows, including horseAlarm, which can monitor wellbeing by analysing sweating and how often the horse is lying down. Another one is an electronic dog collar monitoring your dog's wellbeing by Bio-sense Technologies.

We think that Google Glass is just the beginning for humans, as FIDO is only a starting point for wearable tech for animals, so watch this space!


July 17, 2013Published by: Anton Perreau

Tracking Digital Consumer Behaviour: Deep Digging from McKinsey

Screen Shot 2013-07-16 at 22.08.35

Understanding and tracking the way in which digital consumers behave is becoming more complicated by the minute. Different mediums that didn't even exist a month ago, let alone a decade or a century ago, change on an almost daily basis. Whilst skimming the surface of new digital trends is easy, the ability to gain insight, plan and act upon that knowledge simply can't be performed fast enough until we dig a little deeper.

To help brands with all of this this, McKinsey; the large American global management consulting firm, has produced a report from insights into how digital consumers behave. The report explains that,

'Understanding and acting on the probable contours of change requires reflection and a deep knowledge of customer behavior, industry dynamics, and feedback loops...'

The first comparison made by McKinsey is from their iConsumer research here in Europe. McKinsey defines four segments of the mobile market, stating that whilst they may all have the same mobile plan or handset, the way they consume on those devices is dramatically different.

Source: 2012 McKinsey iConsumer Survey (Europe)

Source: 2012 McKinsey iConsumer Survey (Europe)

The four segments - as shown above, are:

  • Traditionalists: these are consumers that use phones for the purpose they have always been intended - voice calls.
  • Data Principals: use lots of data and barely any voice calling functionality.
  • Data Entertainers: also use little voice but are heavy users of video, music, and games. According to McKinsey,

'Upward of two-thirds of music usage involves streaming services, MP3 files, or satellite radio.'

 

  • Mobile omnivores: are superusers of both voice and data services. Along with the Data Entertainers above, these consumers use over 85% of data traffic.

These segments are prevalent now due to the nature of content that is being consumed, as McKinsey explains,

'Almost half of all video viewing in the United States, for example, takes place in ways that barely existed a generation ago.'

McKinsey continue to explain that when working with a digital-publishing client they found that 80% of visitors to the clients website were very occasional. In analysing the audience, it became clear that to retain loyal profit-generating users a radical change in the business model had to take place, with tiering and specialisation.

Success may require a diversity of business models, one for high intensity users and others to address the broader audience

Source: 2012 McKinsey iConsumer clickstream database (United States)

Whilst focusing on this high-detail explains some of the insight McKinsey have shared through their research and experience. Some of the more broad segments can be explained through six shifts. To summarise:

  • Devices: In personal computing time, the share of mobile phones and tablets has almost doubled since 2008, to 44 percent.
  • Communications: Smartphone use is driven by streaming content, creating it's own issues for mobile carriers.
  • Content: The value in traditional media has eroded. The average number of apps installed on them has doubled since 2008 whilst spending is fragmented and growth uncertain.
  • Social media: Businesses are still trying to use social media as part of their marketing efforts. Achieving measurable returns on social networking platforms is a continuing challenge - at Battenhall we think this is because traditional PR strategies fail to realise the bigger picture of social networking.
  • Video: The increase in the number of video options will pressure traditional advertising-supported business models for distributors, advertisers, and content owners.
  • Retail: Ecommerce only about 5 percent of all retail sales. As connected mobile devices proliferate, they could transform the shopping experience. The combination of mobile retailing and true multichannel integration will transform the buying experience and begin what McKinsey calls, 'the era of Retail 3.0.'

To summarise, McKinsey confirms more echoed rumours amongst the digital community that the digital frontier must be understood and appreciated in order to work for brands and businesses. Data, streaming, captivating content and sharing dominates mobile use whilst the methods in which this media is being transmitted through hardware is out-dated and requires serious attention.

The challenge for brands now is to realise the potential of bespoke solutions for consumers, working with hardware providers, consultants and experts to make a solution that works for all their key stakeholders.

Learn more about the McKinsey report at McKinsey.com.

June 4, 2013Published by: Anton Perreau

FT-Telefónica Millennial Summit: The Interactive Generation

FT-Telefónica Summit - The Royal Opera House

This morning the Battenhall team attended the FT-Telefónica Millenial Summit at The Royal Opera House in Convent Garden. This summit was put together to present the findings of the largest and most comprehensive study of adult millennials conducted to date. One of the key facts extracted from this research is that 80 percent of 18-30 year olds believe technology has made it easier to overcome language barriers and get a job. Overall 44 percent of millenials think technology has had an effect on their lives in all fronts.

Of the 12,171 individuals questioned during the survey, around 79 percent of europeans said they owned a smartphone - higher than the global average of 76 percent. Millenials truly are a smartphone generation. Opportunities for entrepreneurial individuals have never been better, however with all these opportunities there are still staggering issues in the digital world. 62 percent of respondents said that technology has widened the gap between rich and poor, even more concerning is that technology is creating a gender gab with millennial men considering themselves more at the cutting edge of tech than women.

If the issues of today's world aren't enough, than it is tomorrow the respondents are concerned about - 63 per cent say it is difficult for their generation to progress from school to the workplace and 39 percent feel they will not be able to retire, and will need to continue working through their elderly years. This study clearly outlines some dire issues that must be solved. But what of the good news that has come from this study?

Of all the respondents asked, around 70 globally believe they have entrepreneurial opportunities because of technological advances and 11 percent of millennial leaders will drive change solely through technology - an exciting and promising number.

José María Álvarez-Pallete - COO Telefónica

José María Álvarez-Pallete - COO Telefónica

José María Álvarez-Pallete, COO of Telefónica explained his own perspective of the research findings, expressing that there should be a great focus on Millennials because they "have the next great idea not just for changing the world, but for for changing their neighbourhood - both important missions." As more technology filters across the globe, it will become an essential feature to developing countries particularly through mobile and tablet devices.

In his address, José María Álvarez-Pallete explained that technology can create great opportunities if realised by governments and influential decision makers. His own belief is that the possibilities of technology should be open to everyone, but that there is work to be done before this is possible. Álvarez-Pallete continued to dissect some of the key CSR projects Telefónica is driving to encourage a generation of leaders and entrepreneurs, Wayra and Talentum.

Wayra - Telefónica's startup accelerator programme was created to nurture some of the best tech ideas and talent within them. The programme now exists in latin America, the Czech Republic, Germany, Ireland, Spain and the UK. Battenhall works closely with Telefónica as the official brand communications & PR consultant of Wayra. To find out more about Wayra, visit Wayra.org.

Talentum - by creating jobs and digital learning opportunities for young people and university graduates, Telefónica is advocating the youth and technological power of Europe, investing in the talent and potential of young individuals. To find out more about Talentum, visit the Talentum microsite.

To find out more about the FT-Telefónica Millennials survey, visit the microsite at telefonica.com/millennials.