All Posts in Vlogging

September 7, 2015Published by: Joe Cant

Live streaming apps: innovation, or a step too far?

16930072836_0e816aceba_b

Live streaming, as with any innovative medium, has its ups and downs. An unfortunate event which has brought it to light recently was the recent tragic events in Virginia, USA, in which Alison Parker and Adam Ward were gunned down during an interview on live TV, with the killer filming and uploading the entire scene on social media, we look into the effects social media, in particular live streaming, has on society today.

When we look at innovative and popular social media services such as the live streaming apps Periscope and Meerkat, Snapchat with its 4 billion pieces of content uploaded daily, and Instagram which has 300 million active users each month, the potential to disrupt and create problems for broadcasters and established industries is huge.

With the opportunity to broadcast live video wherever you are with just a mobile phone, the need for live TV reporting equipment; vans, cameras and sound operators is increasingly becoming obsolete. Now, if a bystander witnesses a newsworthy event, live streaming apps allow them to become an amateur news reporter for the day - or at the very least a cameraman!

These new apps are not just influencing news reporting and the media landscape but also the sports industry. The ‘fight of the century’ provides a good example. Broadcasters of the boxing match between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao in May suffered as a result of Periscope users live streaming the match for free, rather than paying the $100 pay-per-view charge.

The US National Hockey League, have tried to fight the growth of user generated content by banning live streaming apps in its games. There are clearly concerns where live streaming is concerned. But why? Of course, money. But also brand reputation and experience. Let’s take Wimbledon, the UK’s biggest tennis competition for example.

Wimbledon is broadcast live on BBC throughout the tournament had its own live Periscope stream of the ticket queue outside the grounds, but it banned the use of the app inside the tennis courts. By setting these standards for the tournament are the All England Lawn Tennis Club trying to preserve the quality of content created on site? Or perhaps the image of the brand and the tournament? Or even the eagerness to capture moments on court that not only distract supporters from watching the game instead of their phone but also distracting the players? It’s most likely to be all of the above. But does it even matter?

Whatever the reasons may be, how can you ‘ban’ something that is legally available to the public and is socially encouraged?

The idea behind these apps is that, business aside, they’ve been made to better social media, social interaction and networking. So as a product and service, they’re almost ‘too disruptive’ because they cause complications for already well-established industries, leaving governing bodies only one choice: to ban the use of these apps to protect their TV deals and reputations.

But is it really a huge problem? Do those that ‘ban’ these apps think that enough people are going to tune in to somebody’s shaky, handheld Periscope video, with vertical coverage of a hockey playoff game, or a boxing match from a fairly poor viewpoint?

As well as comparatively bad coverage, the cameras, replays and commentary happening on top rate sports broadcasting channels all provide those vital, in-game, details, and in their own industry they are second to none, using features such as the SkyCam and HD slow motion replays. Can you imagine a football match without watching the goal or the red card tackle again in replay?

It’s uncertain how the live streaming app market will develop, and how their relationships with related industries will work. But it looks like they could be here to stay, if they’re allowed!


August 20, 2015Published by: Jonny Atter

Three top tips for YouTubers working with brands

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 12.49.30

August is the month when YouTubers across the world get together at two major video conventions. At the beginning of the month the massive Vidcon in the USA draws around 20,000 people eager to find out more about video and to meet their idols, and this is quickly followed up by Summer in the City (SITC) - the largest YouTube convention in the UK.

While at SITC last weekend, it quickly became clear that there is increasing emphasis being put on how YouTubers can work with brands. How they can and should work with brands, the problems they face when they do, and how this affects the YouTubers’ viewers.

These are our three top tips for YouTubers we gleaned on working with brands.

  1. Be true to you and your brand

As a YouTuber, you need to retain creative control of the content on your channel. A brand deal has to be a good fit with the YouTuber’s content, otherwise the audience will see through it and label the YouTuber a sell-out. The videos you create should always be created to suit your audience, but most importantly you should work for those brands that really excite you so that you truly enjoy working together.

Brands must learn to give up creative control to YouTubers in order to deliver the most authentic results. When there is too much emphasis on landing key messages for a brand it can come across as somewhat contrived which has ultimately has no value for either party. A brand shouldn’t give a YouTuber a script, just key points they wish to cover.

Equally, YouTubers need to communicate effectively with brands to let them know what they have to offer and be savvy about their approach to journalists when selling in their own stories. At SITC, YouTube Communications Manager, Thea O’Hear talked a lot about the do’s and don’t of contacting journalists and teaching YouTubers how to build their brand through effective PR and media management.

  1. Be transparent

Being transparent and honest with your audience is key and many viewers have quickly realised that some YouTubers treat YouTube as their full time job, and are ok with with the odd branded video as long as it’s upfront and of value to them.

This week the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) released new guidelines for vloggers who work with brands to make sure viewers know when they’re being advertised to. When a the question was raised during #YouTubeHonestyHour panel at SITC, about whether or not YouTubers are seen as sell-outs for taking sponsored deals, it was clear that if the audience knows what to expect from their favourite YouTuber and they’re upfront about it, the viewers really appreciate it.

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 10.23.17

It’s not only the viewers who appreciate it, many of the panelists at SITC agreed that they prefer having the CAP guidelines. Although it can get confusing for viewers when they see some YouTubers following the guidelines and others not. And typically, you’ll find that American YouTubers who dominate the platform, don’t have the same guidelines as British YouTubers do.

  1. Be connected on and offline

Fandom is at all all time high with YouTube viewers and this was evident both at VidCon and SITC. At VidCon they had to restrict access for guests at hotels to maintain control during a YouTuber meet and greet, while at SITC there were queues of people lined up to say hello to their favourite video creator. It’s staggering! Opportunities to meet your favourite YouTuber, or indeed celebrity are incredibly rewarding for your viewers and critical to building your brand further.

It also goes beyond just meet and greets with top YouTubers, it’s a chance for them to meet their online friends too. As a YouTuber myself, it was lovely to meet fellow #Battenveda vloggers Sonja, who spotted me across a room at a panel session, as well as Laura-Christelle, who was volunteer at the event and joined me to make a vlog together.

Finally, both VidCon and SITC presented an important reminder for any brand and YouTuber doing a deal. It’s not just about the numbers, how far a post will reach or if it will ‘go viral’, it’s about providing something of value and something that YouTuber or audience might not have access to ordinarily.

March 16, 2015Published by: Steph Bennett

30 things to vlog about for #BattenVEDA

This April, vloggers from around the world will be taking part in a challenge to vlog every day as part of the #BattenVEDA community. Although the VEDA (Vlog Every Day in April) challenge originated on YouTube, we’re evolving the concept to take it into the realms of other video platforms such as Instagram and Vine for the first time.

Each day vloggers will film, edit and share their videos on their chosen video channels and social networks using the hashtag #BattenVEDA, allowing other participants and their subscribers and followers to watch and enjoy their content. If this sounds like something you'd like to try you can sign up and see who is taking part this time right here.

Vlogging for 30 days straight is no mean feat so the Battenhall team have prepared a calendar of daily prompts as inspiration. There are more detailed descriptions in the Google Calendar too.

#BattenVEDA-2

Next week we’ll be announcing details of our first series of vlogs created by #BattenVEDA veterans with tips and tricks to help you make the most out of your vlogging experience with us.

If you have any questions in the meantime, please don’t hesitate to get in touch via @StephsBubble or steph.bennett@battenhall.net


March 9, 2015Published by: Steph Bennett

#BattenVEDA is back with a twist!

BattenVEDA_Centered_Black

#BattenVEDA is back! We started #BattenVEDA last year as community for vloggers who were taking part in the global YouTube event called VEDA, where participants Vlog Every Day in April or August. It's a tough but rewarding challenge which is open to vloggers of all levels of experience, so whether you're just starting out or a seasoned pro, we'd love you to join us.

We connect our vloggers through a calendar of daily prompts, weekly Twitter chats and regular Google Hangouts and in a twist from the usual calendar creation we asking you what you'd like to see on the list of topics. So, send your topic suggestions through to steph.bennett@battenhall.net by 20th March 2015 for your chance to be featured.

Taking #BattenVEDA to YouTube and beyond

Since VEDA began, the focus has remained exclusively on YouTube but this year we're mixing it up. We're opening up #BattenVEDA to video makers on Instagram and Vine too. We're leaving it's up to you to choose how and where you want to vlog this time.

Register to be part of #BattenVEDA

Registration is completely free of charge and simply allows participants and viewers of #BattenVEDA to find you, connect and subscribe to your channel easily.

The #BattenVEDA Community

You can find everyone who has registered to take part in #BattenVEDA right here, so make time to say 'Hi' and introduce yourself - you'll find that throughout the month of April you'll be spending a lot of time getting to know each other.

If you're a #BattenVEDA veteran or a regular vlogger we'd love to talk to you about creating some additional content with tips and tricks for the community. Please email me at steph.bennett@battenhall.net.

#BattenVEDA Calendar of Topics

Our aim here at Battenhall is to keep you motivated and inspired and each day you'll find a prompt on the #BattenVEDA calendar which launches on Monday 23rd March. If you have a topic you'd like to recommend we feature please do let us know before 20th March 2015.

The calendar is there as guide so feel free to freestyle. This is your VEDA experience so you can vlog about whatever you like! If you want to take part but can only vlog now and then, that's okay too. #BattenVEDA is focused on community first and don't you forget it.

Staying connected

Our Twitter chats will take place every Monday evening at 8pm GMT+1 using the hashtag #BattenChat. Watch out for Google Hangouts and other spontaneous activities may pop up from time to time to make this #BattenVEDA extra special.

Finally, always remember to use the #BattenVEDA hashtag when you share your vlogs on social media and if you have any questions at all please feel free to tweet me @StephsBubble or email me at steph.bennett@battenhall.net.

We can't wait to connect with you and start watching your vlogs! 

November 26, 2014Published by: Janey Spratt

YouTubers: brand endorsement crack down by ASA

maxresdefaultWe recently blogged about the rise of YouTube celebrities and for years now brands have been tapping into their highly engaged audiences through brand endorsements.

The influence of these YouTubers has been picked up by the media this year, uncovering that YouTubers can earn in the region of £100k in return for a day of product endorsement on their channels.

The latest revelation comes from the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) who have noticed that some YouTubers have been breaking advertising standards. Today, the ASA have ruled that Vloggers must clearly declare when a brand has paid for a product to appear in a video.

YouTubers must now clearly mark ‘advert’, ‘promo’ or add a symbol onto the video or in the title. Simply saying ‘this wouldn’t have been possible without the help of *brand*’ isn’t going to cut it anymore. These changes are to protect the YouTuber's audiences who are often very young in age.

In our experience, we’ve managed relationships between brands and YouTubers where both parties have been keen to endorse the campaign message while making it look as natural and as discreet as possible. So these new rules will be a significant change for YouTubers as they work hard to maintain relationships with their loyal subscribers.

With this standardised approach to YouTuber endorsements being enforced by the ASA, the crucial effect yet to be seen will be the impact on subscriber loyalty and engagement. Does this new ruling change the commercial opportunity for brands and YouTube partnerships?

YouTubers owe their success to their loyal fanbases - they know better than anyone that the right content tailored to the audience has the potential to draw in mass support and engagement. As YouTubers grow their fanbases, commercial opportunities begin to appear and the line between fan loyalty and financial gain can become blurred. If the new ASA ruling jeopardises fan loyalty, we predict YouTubers will simply minimise the volume of product placement on their channels to avoid losing subscribers. It may be that YouTubers move over to brands' owned channels when promoting products in return for payment.

Read more on the changes here.

Image credit.


July 8, 2014Published by: Steph Bennett

Register for #BattenVEDA | Vlog Every Day in August

BattenVEDA_Centered_Black

Earlier this year we started #BattenVEDA - a community for vloggers who were taking part in the global YouTube event called VEDA, where participants Vlog Every Day in April or August.

Connecting experienced and new vloggers through a calendar of daily prompts and weekly Twitter chats, we built a network of people around the world that shared a love of vlogging. We also posted vlogging tips and tricks on the Battenhall blog

Now we're back for round two and ready to welcome you all to take part or simply sit back and enjoy the videos of those who will take on the #BattenVEDA challenge.

Register to be part of #BattenVEDA

Registration is completely free of charge and simply allows participants and viewers of #BattenVEDA to find you, connect and subscribe to your channel easily.

The #BattenVEDA Community

You can find everyone who has registered to take part in #BattenVEDA right here, so make time to say 'Hi' and introduce yourself - you'll find that throughout the month of August you'll be spending a lot of time getting to know each other. For those not participating but keen to watch, you can simply use this as your alternative TV guide for the month.

#BattenVEDA Calendar of Topics

Our aim here at Battenhall is to keep you motivated and inspired and each day you'll find a prompt on the #BattenVEDA calendar. Feel free to freestyle however, if you have something else you'd like to talk about too. This is your VEDA experience so you can vlog about whatever you like!

You'll also find our Twitter chats in the calendar which take place every Monday evening at 8pm GMT+1 using the hashtag #BattenChat. Plus, we're also planning some Google Hangouts and other spontaneous activities that may pop up from time to time to make this #BattenVEDA extra special.

Finally, always remember to use the #BattenVEDA hashtag when you share your vlogs on social media and if you have any questions at all please feel free to tweet me @StephsBubble or email me at steph.bennett@battenhall.net.

We can't wait to connect with you and start watching your vlogs! See you all on August 1st!

April 14, 2014Published by: Steph Bennett

#BattenVEDA: Vlogging tips and tricks

It’s day 14 of #BattenVEDA which means we’re almost at the halfway point and I’m delighted to be able to tell you that the 35 vloggers who are taking part in our challenge to vlog every day in April, have produced more than 300 vlogs and come from five different continents: Asia, Australia, North America, South America, and Europe!

#BattenVEDA Community

Some people are sticking to the calendar and others are freestyling. But the one thing they have in common is that they are all  taking on the challenge to film, edit, upload and share their vlogs for thirty days straight!

Tips and tricks

Today we thought we’d share a few quick tricks for all vloggers to take their vlogs from good to great. If you’ve got a trick you’d like to share, please feel free to leave a comment below or tweet us @Battenhall or @StephsBubble using the hashtag #BattenVEDA.

  1. Stop and stare
    It’s totally normal to find yourself looking at the screen and not the camera when filming - I do it all the time! But if you can cast your gaze towards the camera instead not only will you find it a little less intimidating and distracting, you’ll also find yourself talking to the camera in the same way you might have an ordinary conversation with someone. Your viewers will thank you for it!

  2. Umm... and... so…
    Do you think while you vlog? Me too! I constantly find myself filling time with words like ‘umm’ and have to remind myself that it’s okay to pause and actually stop speaking while vlogging. Although it’s daunting at first, the pauses actually help to keep your audience engaged. Let them hang on your every word… and keep them waiting for the next big thing.

  1. Lights, camera, context
    Always check your surroundings when vlogging. Whether you’re filming inside or outdoors lighting is really important so be sure to check for potential reflections from lights or TV screens and glaring sun beams that want to steal your thunder. If you’re using your phone to vlog make sure your camera lens is clean as thumb prints make for fuzzy viewing. Finally, look behind you! As viewers we’re getting a window into your world, your home or city. What do you want us to see?

#BattenChat
For more tips and tricks and generally vlogging chatter, each Monday at 8pm GMT we host #BattenChat on Twitter. If you’re curious to see what we’re chatting about - don’t be shy - you’re more than welcome to join us. Simply follow @Battenhall on Twitter and use #BattenChat in every tweet to get involved. We’ve also set up a chatroom on Twubs too that brings all the tweets together in one place: http://twubs.com/battenchat. We hope to see you there!

Finally, to keep up to date with all the #BattenVEDA vlogs, check out our Twitter list of vloggers.