All Posts in messaging

November 24, 2015Published by: Drew

How messaging apps are reinventing customer care for brands

If you subscribe to the Battenhall WhatsApp, you will know just how much messaging apps are disrupting brand communications - not just because you'll be used to receiving from us what you might otherwise have taken from a newsletter or a Twitter trawl, but through the content that we share through it too, that shows daily how our clients and brands across the world are innovating with their use of messaging apps such as WhatsApp, Snapchat, Viber, Line, Firechat, Facebook Messenger, Instagram messaging and the list goes on.

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September 1, 2015Published by: Anton Perreau

LinkedIn Launches Messaging Platform

LinkedIn mobile messaging

The new LinkedIn messaging platform has a clean, crisp design. Perhaps a hint at the new look of LinkedIn? Image via blog.linkedin.com

For a long time, LinkedIn has relied on a messaging system called 'InMail' - however this was always much more like email than messaging, which feels alot more like texting. Now - a little late to the game, LinkedIn has launched a direct messaging option - fast, casual messaging that works a bit like the features so many other social networks launched  along time ago.

The new interface for LinkedIn's messages is clean, clear and allows you to attach images, GIFs, emojis and stickers. LinkedIn's new feature is only being rolled out to an initial "10 percent ramp to English global members," meaning that many of you may not see it for a little while. But tweet us your first impressions of it when you get a look in. The rest of the userbase will see the update in the coming weeks, the company said.

No surprises too that LinkedIn may be adding a bit of smart artificial intelligence to it's messaging product someday, as explained in re/code“We're excited about concepts like intelligent messaging assistants that can help suggest people you should message or provide you with relevant information about that person before you start a conversation,” wrote Mark Hull, LinkedIn’s director of product management, in a blog post. “Or the possibilities with voice and video to make conversations more compelling.”

To learn more about this new feature from LinkedIn, read about it on the LinkedIn blog. To share your own thoughts, tweet us at @battenhall.

April 17, 2014Published by: Anton Perreau

Facebook’s brave new venture into unbranded apps

Facebook Paper

Throughout it's development, much of Mark Zuckerberg's focus for Facebook has been to bring people inside the Facebook iOS and Android Apps, onto the platform and through the channels that are Facebook branded. However, now this strategy has changed - a new direction to "unbundle the big blue app" has been set instead to build lots of apps.

These new apps, developed by Creative Labs - may sometimes not even require Facebook logins to use. Battenhall has been one of the few users on the Facebook Paper app since it launched in January. Obviously, it's not big news that Facebook will be developing new stand-alone apps - in 2011 it released Messenger, without any Facebook branding. As explained in The New York Times - users prefer single-purpose apps, they work faster and they're more in tune with the use cases for mobile devices.

Whilst it hasn't been overly popular, the user experience on Paper is incredible - it's unlike the Facebook app as developers were given free reign to try new things. The idea here is that more apps in the future can be developed with new rules in mind. This new strategy comes with obvious risks - but when a platform has a massive user base, it can become difficult to innovate.

The idea behind all of this is that through creating new experiences in apps like Paper and Messenger, Facebook can be everywhere, unbranded - you might not know it but some of the future apps you'll be using might have Facebook written all over them.

To read more on Facebook's new Creative Labs strategy, head to The New York Times.


December 13, 2013Published by: Drew

From public to private: Instagram launches direct messaging feature

Private photo-sharing is the latest craze sweeping social media platforms. Just recently, Twitter launched a new app that enabled its users to do just that direct messaging.

As if that didn’t already have SnapChat feeling vulnerable, Instagram - which has around 150 million users - has just introduced direct messaging to its service.

No longer is it mandatory for users to share photos of their lunch publicly; they can now share them with their peers alone and also receive private pictures and videos from those they follow.

While this new addition to Instagram will be welcomed by its user base, who now have more choice in how they share their photos and videos on Instagram, what new opportunities does it present for brands?

Certainly, the ability to directly message users provides brands with an opportunity for some customer relationship management (CRM) and facilitate deeper relationships with their customers. Gap has already seen the potential of this by messaging the first 15 individual people who commented on one of its posts with a limited edition Gap product.

As well as this, brands can directly deal with customers' complaints in the same way they might do on Twitter. With direct messaging, brands can truly have one-on-one conversations with its customers and offer a more bespoke service.

With its introduction of video sharing (taking a leaf out of Vine’s book), sponsored posts and now direct messaging, its clear that Instagram wants to be more than just a photo and video sharing service but a social media platform that provides numerous opportunities for users’ and brands’ communication needs. Ultimately, this will make Instagram a more profitable platform for its shareholders.

Whether or not the Facebook owned platform can make this transition is still up for debate but what is certain is that Instagram has big ambitions and, with all the new features it has announced and implemented this year, it certainly isn’t keeping them private.