All Posts in youtube

October 12, 2016Published by: Andrew McClenaghan

Could social media be about to change the face of football?

In the UK, many football clubs are considered to be institutions. Manchester United, Tottenham and Arsenal for example, are steeped in decades of history. Their past is part of their continued appeal and their successes, coupled with how social media amplifies their fan base around the world, means it’s hard to imagine how any new team could attract any similar attention.

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March 24, 2016Published by: Jonny Atter

YouTube ups its live streaming capabilities

Have you tried live streaming video yet? It's increasingly at our finger tips with Facebook Live and Periscope but now YouTube has stepped into the game too. Although YouTube has had live streaming capability for a while now it had to be done through Google+ and Hangouts if you were on a desktop, or through the YouTube creator app if on mobile and wasn't always the most user friendly experience.

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December 11, 2015Published by: Samantha Sy

2015 in review according to YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and Apple

This week the world's social networks have released their picks of the biggest moments 2015. With the New Year approaching, these reviews give a great insight into how we consumed and shared media this year, and perhaps why the impression of how 2015 went down is different depending on the social network you favour. It shows trending topics from a range of different interests that we, as a world, joined together to appreciate, sympathise and enjoy.

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April 17, 2015Published by: Sharmin Cheema-Kelly

Ofcom considers deregulation to take growing power of internet into account

The shift to digital in recent years has meant an uphill challenge for British communications regulator, Ofcom, as it seeks to adapt its own regulations to the changing media and telecoms landscape.

Credit: Ofcom

Picture Credit: Ofcom

In her first interview since being appointed as Ofcom's chief in December, Sharon White said that deregulation and a lighter approach needs to be considered to reflect the tectonic shifts in how people read and watch content, as well as talk.

Ofcom has just begun its first review of the British communications market in a decade to take into account the burgeoning impact of the internet, and whether market definitions and regulations need to be redrawn. Ofcom would also need to consider the intersection and blurring distinctions between traditional telecom and media companies.

Live streaming services such as Meerkat and Periscope both present a challenge to the paid-TV world especially with the increasing costs of football rights, for example. While Ofcom traditionally appointed the Advertising Standard Authority (ASA) to regulate broadcast advertisements on its behalf, YouTube advertising also falls under the ASA's jurisdiction - the roles both perform and the areas overseen need to be made clearer in this era of greater convergence.

Ten years after its last review and in the age of the internet, the time is now ripe for Ofcom to reconsider regulations especially when changes are unprecedented and happen at much greater speed. It's exciting times ahead for the tech, media, and communications industries and we can't wait to see what happens next.

 


March 16, 2015Published by: Steph Bennett

30 things to vlog about for #BattenVEDA

This April, vloggers from around the world will be taking part in a challenge to vlog every day as part of the #BattenVEDA community. Although the VEDA (Vlog Every Day in April) challenge originated on YouTube, we’re evolving the concept to take it into the realms of other video platforms such as Instagram and Vine for the first time.

Each day vloggers will film, edit and share their videos on their chosen video channels and social networks using the hashtag #BattenVEDA, allowing other participants and their subscribers and followers to watch and enjoy their content. If this sounds like something you'd like to try you can sign up and see who is taking part this time right here.

Vlogging for 30 days straight is no mean feat so the Battenhall team have prepared a calendar of daily prompts as inspiration. There are more detailed descriptions in the Google Calendar too.

#BattenVEDA-2

Next week we’ll be announcing details of our first series of vlogs created by #BattenVEDA veterans with tips and tricks to help you make the most out of your vlogging experience with us.

If you have any questions in the meantime, please don’t hesitate to get in touch via @StephsBubble or steph.bennett@battenhall.net

February 20, 2015Published by: Janey Spratt

Google launches ‘KidsTube’ app

_81131384_youtubekidslogoToday, YouTube announced that it will be launching a YouTube Kids app in the US on Monday. This will be a free, Android only app designed specifically for the younger generation and their tastes.

The app will offer family-friendly content under the categories of shows, music, learning and explore - allowing children to browse safely. Kids will be able to search for specific topics; however parents can disable certain ‘nightmare inducing’ searches (think sharks, spiders and dinosaurs!). Parents will also be able to limit the amount of time their child spends on the app.

The news will be reassuring to parents particularly as a recent Telegraph article looking at the history and future of YouTube points out that  "Almost anyone can upload almost anything to YouTube, for free, and be in with a chance of reaching its one billion monthly users – whether they’re activists, terrorists, politicians or pop stars (or just the proud owner of a “mutant giant spider dog”). It has changed our world."

YouTube really has changed our world and in recent years, we’ve seen the rise of YouTubers and YouTube talent. Similarly, 'KidsTube' has the potential to change how the future generation consumes media. We see kids playing on iPads on public transport or in restaurants more and more - it’s alarming how competent some young children are with the various iPhone and iPad functions, learning ‘swipe to unlock’ before learning to walk or talk.

We’re thrilled to see one of the top social networks taking measures to keep kids safe online as well as the impact this might have on children’s entertainment trends. We can’t wait to see how this new app impacts digital trends for generation Z.

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February 11, 2015Published by: Drew

How YouTube has changed advertising

how youtube changed the world

A long-read worth reading if you work in communications is this feature in The Telegraph on the history and future of YouTube, it's impact on politics, brands, advertising and beyond.

The feature looks at how the social network, which for 9 years has been owned by Google, has made the world a more transparent place, and more lately has changed how organisations interact with the public, both direct and through the new YouTuber influencers.

The piece looks at how politicians are tailoring speech length to YouTube in order to increase views (3mins 29 is a good length), how product launches and promotions have been revolutionised, and how brands such as Topshop work with Vloggers like Zoella and get a whopping 40% / 2.8m clicks on product endorsements. The piece goes on to say:

The internet was meant to kill off advertising. Instead of sitting through annoying commercials during television broadcasts, we’d go online to watch uninterrupted dramas, comedies and silly clips. Curiously, though, last year's ten most-watched (non-music) videos on YouTube included four adverts.

Well worth a read for social media video experts and beginners alike.

November 26, 2014Published by: Janey Spratt

YouTubers: brand endorsement crack down by ASA

maxresdefaultWe recently blogged about the rise of YouTube celebrities and for years now brands have been tapping into their highly engaged audiences through brand endorsements.

The influence of these YouTubers has been picked up by the media this year, uncovering that YouTubers can earn in the region of £100k in return for a day of product endorsement on their channels.

The latest revelation comes from the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) who have noticed that some YouTubers have been breaking advertising standards. Today, the ASA have ruled that Vloggers must clearly declare when a brand has paid for a product to appear in a video.

YouTubers must now clearly mark ‘advert’, ‘promo’ or add a symbol onto the video or in the title. Simply saying ‘this wouldn’t have been possible without the help of *brand*’ isn’t going to cut it anymore. These changes are to protect the YouTuber's audiences who are often very young in age.

In our experience, we’ve managed relationships between brands and YouTubers where both parties have been keen to endorse the campaign message while making it look as natural and as discreet as possible. So these new rules will be a significant change for YouTubers as they work hard to maintain relationships with their loyal subscribers.

With this standardised approach to YouTuber endorsements being enforced by the ASA, the crucial effect yet to be seen will be the impact on subscriber loyalty and engagement. Does this new ruling change the commercial opportunity for brands and YouTube partnerships?

YouTubers owe their success to their loyal fanbases - they know better than anyone that the right content tailored to the audience has the potential to draw in mass support and engagement. As YouTubers grow their fanbases, commercial opportunities begin to appear and the line between fan loyalty and financial gain can become blurred. If the new ASA ruling jeopardises fan loyalty, we predict YouTubers will simply minimise the volume of product placement on their channels to avoid losing subscribers. It may be that YouTubers move over to brands' owned channels when promoting products in return for payment.

Read more on the changes here.

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